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3 Family Goals to Set in 2018 for a Healthier Smile

Jan. 15 2018

General & Family Dentistry Melville, NYNow that the new year is here you likely fit into one of two categories: you are already working on your new year's resolutions, or you still have yet to decide on what you’re going to focus on this year. Whatever category you’re in, there’s one thing for certain: nothing will make your goals more attainable than having the support of your family. So, to help you make your goals that much more in reach, why not set goals together as a family? To help you ensure that your family stays cavity free all year long, we have created a list of three new year's resolutions you and your family can try together to make 2018 your best year yet.

Avoid Sugar

This may be the hardest goal you will set as a family, but it may also be the most rewarding. You may not realize it, but sugar is in just about everything we eat. Yes, it’s in candy and baked goods, but sugar is also in things like pasta sauce, bbq sauce, and even peanut butter. And although a little sugar isn’t going to hurt you, too much sugar can wreak havoc on your blood sugar, waistline, and, you guessed it, even your teeth. Set a goal as a family to try to cut down on your sugar intake this year.

Brush More Often

The American Dental Association recommends that people brush their teeth at least twice a day which most people translate into just twice a day— ignoring the “at least” portion of the recommendation. As a family, try to set a goal to brush more than twice a day. For instance, try encouraging your kids to brush their teeth when they get home from school each day— the extra tooth brushing session will help them cut down on cavities.

Switch Out Your Toothbrushes Regularly

The American Dental Association also recommends that patients switch out their toothbrush every three to four months. If, however, your family isn’t into a habit of switching out their toothbrushes on a regular basis, you may be contributing to cavities and bacteria. Old toothbrushes not only have worn down bristles that don’t clean teeth as well but they also harbor germs and bacteria. Make an alert on your phone to change out your family’s toothbrushes every three months.

By incorporating these three tips into your dental routine, you and your family can have a healthier smile all year long. To learn more about your family’s dental health, schedule an appointment with Dr. Dean Glasser at our Melville office today!


Dr. Dean Glasser is a respected Cosmetic and General Dentist, serving Melville, NY and the greater Long Island area. A Professor at Columbia University Dental School, Dr. Glasser is recognized as a Diplomate of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists and as a Fellow of the following organizations: the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, the Academy of General Dentistry, the American Association of Hospital Dentistry and the Misch Implant Institute.

3 Ways to Get the Most Out of Everyday Brushing

Jan. 15 2017

dental brushingEveryone knows that to have a healthy smile, they have to brush regularly and visit Dr. Dean Glasser for frequent cleanings. Brushing both morning and night not only helps to get plaque off of your teeth but it also helps to fight bacteria in your mouth. As something that you have hopefully been doing since you were around two years old, the last thing you likely think about is what type of toothbrush and toothpaste you are using. However, to make sure that you are getting your teeth as clean as possible, you should be using fluoride toothpaste, picking the proper toothbrush, and listening to your teeth. Read on to learn more.

Use Fluoride Toothpaste

When strolling down the toothpaste aisle at your grocery or drug store, it’s going to be nearly impossible to find a toothpaste that doesn’t have fluoride in it. Fluoride is an essential ingredient in toothpaste because it works to strengthen your enamel and prevent your teeth from weakening. Additionally, as an FDA approved ingredient, fluoride is safe to use on both children and adults, but you should consult Dr. Dean Glasser before your child starts using toothpaste.

Pick the Proper Brush

Another thing that is often neglected is purchasing the right toothbrush for your mouth and dental needs. Toothbrushes not only come in different shapes but also different bristle textures. For instance, you can choose a medium, soft, or extra-soft bristled toothbrush. Unless you have dentures, there is no reason that you should be using a medium toothbrush. Soft toothbrushes can just as effectively clean your teeth without wearing down the enamel. If you have gum disease or sensitive teeth, you should use an extra-soft bristled toothbrush.

Listen to Your Teeth

Are your teeth sore after you brush them? Do they feel sensitive to hot or cold foods and beverages? One of the most important thing that you can do for your oral health is to listen to your teeth. If you notice that they are uncomfortable after you brush them, schedule an appointment with Dr. Dean Glasser to get them looked at.

The art of tooth-brushing is something that often gets pushed to the side. However, by using the tips listed above, you can brush your teeth both morning and night. To learn more about your oral health or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Dean Glasser, contact our office today!

 

 

 


Dr. Dean Glasser is a respected Cosmetic and General Dentist, serving Melville, NY and the greater Long Island area. A Professor at Columbia University Dental School, Dr. Glasser is recognized as a Diplomate of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists and as a Fellow of the following organizations: the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, the Academy of General Dentistry, the American Association of Hospital Dentistry and the Misch Implant Institute.

Consider Your Breath

Oct. 15 2016

bad breathIf your co-worker slips you a mint or if a good-night kiss is but a memory, you may be suffering from bad breath - the very common, embarrassing condition also known as halitosis - and even your best friends may fail to tell you.

The main source of bad breath is a sulfur gas produced by accumulated bacteria in your mouth - which collects on your teeth, gums and tongue. However, there may be other bad breath culprits at work:

  • It could be what you are eating. Garlic and onions, especially, contain compounds which are taken into your blood cells and expelled through your lungs. That means your breath actually smells, not just your mouth.
  • It could be your nose or nasal passages. Bacteria in your nose and sinus cavities or a sinus infection can cause foul smelling secretions to exit your nasal passages. This is commonly a cause of bad breath. A saline nasal wash may help, but if the problem persists, you should see an ear, nose and throat specialist.
  • It could be tonsil stones. Tonsil stones, also called tonsiloliths, are made of lymph tissue and bacteria which form lumps in the back of your throat, near your tonsils. They contain crevices where bacteria accumulates. If enough bacteria get caught, tonsil stones can contribute to bad breath.
  • It could be your tongue. It’s a good idea to brush your tongue when you brush your teeth. Also try using a tongue scraper to remove bacteria from the back of your tongue.
  • It could be your stomach. If none of the above is causing your bad breath, or if it persists in spite of your best efforts, you may want to see a doctor. In some cases, stomach problems, such as acid reflux, can cause bad breath.

As a final reminder, have you had a dental check-up and cleaning lately? A dental check-up may reveal halitosis-causing plaque, gingivitis and tooth decay. Stay current with your twice-yearly check-ups and cleanings and don’t forget to brush and floss daily. Call to schedule an appointment with Dr. Glasser, today: (631) 423-6767.


Dr. Dean Glasser is a respected Cosmetic and General Dentist, serving Melville, NY and the greater Long Island area. A Professor at Columbia University Dental School, Dr. Glasser is recognized as a Diplomate of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists and as a Fellow of the following organizations: the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, the Academy of General Dentistry, the American Association of Hospital Dentistry and the Misch Implant Institute.

Consider These Aging Dental Concerns

Jun. 15 2016

dental healthAs you age, your teeth age, and taking care of your teeth is as important as taking care of your body. Read on to learn more about a few of the conditions that can affect the aging mouth.

Dry Mouth

You may wonder why you’re getting cavities when you haven’t had them in years. Aging means entering a second round of cavity prone years. Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging, but it is a side-effect of more than 500 medications, including those for allergies, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, pain, anxiety, and Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. What to do?

  • Drink more water.
  • Use over-the-counter oral moisturizers.
  • Use sugar-free gum or lozenges to stimulate saliva production.
  • Get a humidifier to help keep moisture in the air.
  • Avoid beverages that irritate dry mouths, like coffee, alcohol, carbonated soft drinks, and acidic fruit juices.
  • Tell your dentist about any medications that you’re taking.

Oral Cancer

The American Cancer Society, estimates that each year there are 35,000 diagnosed cases of mouth, throat and tongue cancer. The average age of those diagnosed with these cancers is 62. Regular dental visits are vital because oral cancer is not usually painful in the early stages and early detection saves lives. Some visible symptoms include open sores, white or reddish patches, and any changes in the lips, tongue and lining of the mouth that last for more than two weeks.

Periodontal or Gum Disease

The risks of gum disease increase with age. Periodontal or gum disease is caused by the bacteria in plaque. Little pockets form at the gum line where bacteria can grow. If left untreated, bacterial infections can cause damage to connective tissue and bone, leading to tooth loss. Gum disease is often a painless condition until the advanced stage, when it eventually destroys the gums, bone and ligaments supporting the teeth, leading to tooth loss. Regular dental visits can ensure that gum disease is treated or prevented entirely.

Dr. Glasser specializes in geriatric dentistry and wants to help you have the best-looking smile every day of your life. Call to schedule an appointment, today: (631) 423-6767.


Dr. Dean Glasser is a respected Cosmetic and General Dentist, serving Melville, NY and the greater Long Island area. A Professor at Columbia University Dental School, Dr. Glasser is recognized as a Diplomate of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists and as a Fellow of the following organizations: the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, the Academy of General Dentistry, the American Association of Hospital Dentistry and the Misch Implant Institute.

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My family and I have been using Dr. Glasser for 30 years. He is the best! He is a professional through and through as well a great guy. He's honest, ethical & always has his patients best interest at heart. He did an excellent job on my implants and caps I could not have gotten a better more beautiful new set of teeth any where else. - Richard G.

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